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Antoinette Miller
Professor
antoinettemiller@clayton.edu
Psychology Department
Clayton State University
Abnormal Psychology in the Hundred Acre Wood 

In 2000, Sara E. Shea and co-authors published "Pathology in the Hundred Acre Wood: A neurodevelopmental perspective on A.A. Milne" in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. That article gave provisional "diagnoses" to Christopher Robin and his various companions under the then-current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria. For example, Winnie-the-Pooh was diagnosed as suffering from ADHD (inattentive subtype) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), while Piglet's condition fell under the heading of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.  This case study is based on that article in order make discussion of difficult topics more accessible and less threatening without minimizing their importance and seriousness. Students in abnormal psychology or other psychology classes will use various explanatory models including behavioral, biological, cognitive, psychodynamic, humanistic-existential, and sociocultural to discuss possible contributing factors and treatment options (as appropriate to an undergraduate class) for these and other inhabitants of the forest.  The case also provides resources for students to discuss the 2013 transition from the DSM-IV to the DSM-5, and the changes in the diagnostic system inherent in the new edition.


I Can See Clearly Now: Mini Cases in Perception

This series of mini cases focuses on the cortical areas associated with vision and visual perception. Each case depicts a breakdown in visual perception that may be traced to damage in an area or areas of the visual system and is based upon an actual cases reported in the literature. These mini cases could be used in a variety of courses, including physiological psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive science, sensation and perception, and cognitive neuropsychology/neuroscience.


Mini Cases in Movement Disorders 

This collection of six short cases focuses on brain areas and neurotransmitters involved in the control of movement. Students are divided into working groups and given one or more of the case descriptions. Each scenario depicts a breakdown in the motor system that can be traced (at least in part) to some brain area or areas. Useful for a variety of courses, including physiological psychology and neurobiology, these cases are intended to give students an opportunity to apply knowledge gained from readings and lectures to real-life situations inspired by patient cases described in the literature.


Speak Up!: Mini Cases in Language

This series of mini cases focuses on language deficits (aphasias) and their likely organic causes (problems in specific brain areas). Students read one of the six cases, which are based on actual cases reported in the literature, and connect the symptoms described in the case to a specific aphasia and the affected brain area(s). The cases could be used in a variety of courses, including physiological psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive science, sensation and perception, and cognitive neuropsychology/neuroscience.