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Community-Based Management and Conservation in Africa

Trade-Offs and Synergies in Land-Use Decisions in Local Villages


Author(s)

http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/collection/detail.html?case_id=745&id=745
Narcisa G. Pricope
Geography and Geology
University of North Carolina at Wilmington
pricopen@uncw.edu
Andrea E. Gaughan
Geography and Geosciences
University of Louisville
ae.gaughan@louisville.edu
Susan C. Caplow
Carolina Population Center
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
scaplow@email.unc.edu

Abstract

Niko lives in Namibia and is about to attend a community meeting at which the fate of his family's re-settlement will be decided. He is not sure what would be best for his family; his father does not want to move while his brother is optimistic that the move will improve their lives. How should Niko's community balance their declining rain-fed agricultural production with an increasing need to conserve charismatic megafauna? Niko's situation is used as the basis of a simulation activity in which students are assigned to one of three different African communities faced with a similar relocation decision. Students learn about a complex socio-environmental system from biophysical, socio-economic, and cultural viewpoints and are introduced to the basic governance and management structures characteristic of these communities. The case was created for introductory or mid-level courses in natural resource conservation, wildlife conservation, or environmental sociology, but it may also be appropriate for various geography courses and seminars. A PowerPoint file (which includes a link to a video with background information) is included as supplementary, supporting material.


Objectives

  • Analyze a complex local issue from an integrated socio-environmental perspective.
  • Understand that decisions and actions at different scales affect outcomes in remote, small villages in southern Africa.
  • Examine trade-offs and synergies between development and conservation in lesser-developed nations.
  • Use data and information from disparate points of view to inform decision-making.
  • Understand different cultural perceptions of natural resources.

Keywords

Community-based natural resource management; human-environment interactions; conservation; development; land use; regional ecosystems; biodiversity; sub-Saharan; Namibia; Africa

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF, PowerPoint

Type Methods

Dilemma/Decision, Discussion, Interrupted

Language

English

Subject Headings

Natural Resource Management Wildlife Management Geography Ecology Sociology Economics Interdisciplinary Sciences


Date Posted

9/9/2014

Teaching Notes

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Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Supplemental Materials

A PowerPoint file with background information on the Kavango-Zambezi Conservation Transfrontier Area (KAZA) is available as supporting material for the case study. The PPT also includes a link to a video (made by some of the authors of the case) that provides a visual introduction to the area.


  namibia.ppt

Answer Key

Answer keys for the cases in our collection are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

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