2017 Conference Program


 

Friday, September 15, 2017

 

8AM – 9AM

REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST


9AM – 9:15AM

Welcoming Remarks
Nancy Schiller and Clyde (Kipp) Herreid, Directors, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY


9:15AM – 10:15AM

KEYNOTE SESSION

Effectiveness of Using Human Case Studies to Teach Evolution
Briana Pobiner, Paleoanthropologist and Educator, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC

There are hardly more universally compelling questions in science than those about our origins and evolution as a species, and discoveries about human evolutionary biology spark great interest across students of all ages. Yet biology teachers are on the front lines of myriad challenges to teaching and learning evolution – conceptual, cognitive, social, and more. While a pedagogical focus on human evolution is potentially (socially) controversial, growing research demonstrates that using human case studies can be an engaging and effective way to teach core concepts of evolution. This plenary talk will present evidence from a study of AP Biology students across the United States that indicates that curriculum materials using human examples to teach natural selection, coupled with classroom activities designed to be sensitive to students’ non-scientific views of human origins, increased students’ understanding and acceptance of evolution.


10:15AM – 10:30AM

COFFEE BREAK


10:30AM – 12PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 1

Track A: What Is a Case? / Different Types of Cases
Kipp Herreid, Director, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Business and law schools have a long tradition of using real or simulated stories, or cases, to teach students about their fields. The case method has been effective in capturing the imagination and attention of students in medicine, psychology, and teacher education as well. The formal use of case studies in the science classroom is still relatively new, however. Yet cases have great pedagogical potential, not only for teaching scientific methodology, ethics, and the relationship of scientists to society, but also for delivering content-rich courses. In this workshop, we will cover the elements of a case study, the different forms cases can take, and the many different ways of teaching them.

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Track B: Using Formative Assessment Effectively
Aditi Pai, Associate Professor of Biology, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA

Educators typically rely on summative assessment to make important judgments on whether or not student learning is satisfactory.  Accordingly, much attention is paid to the design of summative assessments such as exams. However, formative assessment is a more important tool as a means of promoting student learning. The aim of this session is to promote a discussion on how best to design and use formative assessment. It will: (1) Provide a basic introduction to assessment; (2) Describe the model of assessment developed by Dr. Alexander W. Astin, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Higher Education and Organizational Change, UCLA; (3) Discuss formative vs summative assessment strategies; and (4) Focus on tips on how to use formative assessment data for enhancing student learning in class.


12PM – 1PM

LUNCH


1PM – 2:30PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 2

Track A: The Discussion Case Method
Kipp Herreid, Director, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Business and law schools have for many years taught cases by way of the discussion method. Discussion cases are typically written as dilemmas that give the history of an individual, institution, organization, or community facing a problem that must be solved. The teacher's goal is to help students analyze the problem and consider possible solutions and their consequences. On the surface of it, the method is simple: the instructor asks probing questions and the students analyze the problem presented in the story with probity and brilliance. Most science teachers, however, have little or no experience running this type of a class. In this session, you will have the opportunity to participate in a discussion case and then analyze the process of teaching it.

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Track B: HHMI BioInteractive and Case Studies
Annie Prud’homme-Genereux, Founding Professor, Life Sciences, Quest University Canada, and Melissa Csikari, Program Officer, Science Education, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

HHMI BioInteractive and the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science have teamed up to pair case studies with associated resources and you can use them together to "flip" your class. A flipped classroom is one where students learn about basic concepts as homework (typically by watching videos or through assigned readings), and in class they interact with peers in hands-on activities. This allows them to understand the concepts in more depth and practice skills such as collaboration, communication, and critical thinking. This workshop will introduce the flipped format using cases and will introduce participants to resources in the HHMI BioInteractive collection. This session will be offered in a flipped format, allowing participants to experience and reflect on this method. This means there is homework to do! Please be sure to view the assigned media ahead of this session. More information will be provided when you register!


2:30PM – 2:45PM

COFFEE BREAK


2:45PM – 4:15PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 3

Track A:  Filling Your Case Study Toolkit: Tips, Tricks, and Tools for Teaching with Cases
Annie Prud'homme-Genereux, Founding Professor, Life Sciences, Quest University Canada

Whether you are a seasoned case study teacher or are just getting started, you are probably seeking tools that you can use to manage the case study classroom more effectively. This session will familiarize you with some of the most useful strategies I have accumulated for teaching with cases. You will experience, and we will discuss, strategies for forming student teams and managing them effectively as well as ways of ensuring that students take responsibility for their learning and do their homework ahead of a case. You will have the opportunity to play with some free and fun technology that you can use to pool student feedback anonymously and you will become familiar with a set of resources that you can use to formulate questions that supplement a case and confront students with their misconceptions. I accumulated and selected these resources over 15 years; save yourself years of searching and experience them all in 90 minutes!.

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Track B:  Personalizing the Curriculum to Make Science Education More Effective
Aditi Pai, Associate Professor of Biology, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA

Often students find science too abstract and even alienating. A novel approach to increase student engagement in STEM fields may be through making the science curriculum personally relevant to the learners. This session will describe lessons learned from a personalized introductory biology course. This course was "personalized" with a genetics and genealogy (G&G) approach. The G&G approach is aimed at stimulating interest in the study of science and the pursuit of a STEM career by priming students with the discovery of unique facts about themselves (genes and genealogy), their history, and their relatedness to other humans in the world (evolutionary processes). Students were encouraged to enhance this experience with a visual art project using an app called "DNA Portrait Builder." Potentially such an approach can improve student understanding of core concepts and reverse the misperception that the practice of science and its benefits are limited to a small, privileged segment of society, with one goal being increased interest among underrepresented individuals in pursuing a science career.


5:30PM – 7PM

POSTER SESSION / COCKTAIL HOUR (CASH BAR)


7PM – 8PM

DINNER


 

Saturday, September 16, 2017

 

8AM – 8:30AM

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST


8:30AM – 10:00AM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 4

Track A: The Interrupted Case Method
Kipp Herreid, Director, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

In the interrupted case method, students are given a problem (a case study) to work on in stages in small groups. After the groups are given a short time to discuss the initial information they receive, the instructor provides additional information to analyze, apply, and discuss. This sequence is repeated several times as the problem gets closer to resolution. One of the great virtues of the method is the way it mimics how real scientists go about their work. Scientists do not have all of the facts at once; they get them piecemeal. This method of “progressive disclosure” is also characteristic of problem-based learning (PBL), but in the interrupted case method the case typically is accomplished in a single class period rather than over several days. In this workshop, you will participate in an interrupted case study and then analyze the experience.

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Track B:  Art, Science, and Flipped Case Videos
Phil Gibson, Paul G. Risser Innovative Teaching Fellow and Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Plant Physiology and Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

The “flipped” case study is a new variation on the case study theme that presents new opportunities to engage students in novel ways both in and out of the classroom. With a flipped case study, students prepare for the case in advance, typically by viewing videos as homework. After exploring different methods for developing and using flipped cases, I have had a mixture of successes and challenges. In this session, I will present my experiences and approaches to producing videos for flipped cases and how I use them in my courses. Participants will then begin outlining the structure of a flipped case video and identifying the steps they will take to begin its production.


10:00AM – 10:15AM

COFFEE BREAK


10:15AM – 11:45PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 5

Track A:  How to Write a Case
Kipp Herreid, Director, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Finding a topic isn't difficult. Cases can be used to teach almost any topic, from mitosis to nuclear fission. The challenge is how to craft a case study so that it achieves your teaching objectives while providing students with a compelling story that is relevant and thought-provoking. In this workshop, we will provide you with a recipe for writing successful cases. Join us and leave the workshop with a rough draft of a case for one of your own courses.

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Track B: A “Perfect Medley” for Teaching Science: Combining Team-Based Learning and Case Studies
Sandra Westmoreland, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX

In this workshop, we will first quickly share concerns about teaching difficult science concepts (what are they?), creating student-relevant lessons (why should students care?), and fostering reading skills and critical thinking (why is this important?). We will then introduce the concept of using Team-Based Learning and case studies to assist in accomplishing these goals. Participants will complete a model Team-Based Learning lesson by working in small teams. We will end with an inter-team discussion on the model lesson during which each team will “take a stand” on their group’s decision. Go home with one new lesson ready to teach right away and, even better, insight into a new method for creating your own Team-Based Learning lessons using case studies.


11:45PM – 12:45PM

LUNCH


12:45PM – 2:15PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 6

Track A: Writing your First Journal Case Study
Annie Prud'homme-Genereux, Founding Professor, Life Sciences, Quest University Canada

Research papers are stories that recount the heroic journey taken by scientists in their quest for hidden treasures. We often use these tales to transmit our scientific culture and to inspire our apprentices.  Using these stories is a good idea, but the articles themselves may not be the best way to encourage students to become the heroes of tomorrow’s stories. For one thing, research papers are infused with secret language and refer to the use of magical tools unfamiliar to a novice. The heroes of the stories are presented as successful, wise, and all-knowing, leaving apprentices with little confidence that they could have done as well.  Perhaps most importantly, a journal article is presented as a continuous narrative and doesn’t give students the opportunity to pause and consider the path they would have taken when faced with a similar quest. Nor does it give them a chance to make hypotheses, design experiments, and predict and critique results. In short, a journal article does not give students the opportunity to practice the skills of thinking like a scientist. Converting a journal article into a case study solves this problem. This workshop will take you through the steps of writing a journal case study.

Note: You must bring a research paper that you would like to convert into a case study. Not all articles are suitable for conversion to a journal case. Bring an article that has straightforward methods, and one for which  a student could be expected to predict the results if given the hypothesis and methods. You should know this article well and preferably have done some background research about it. Who are the authors? What was their context? Why did they choose to research this topic? Where did they do the work, with whom, and when? Basically, you should know who, what, when, where, why, and how.

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Track B:  The Never Ending Story: Using Cases Across Multiple Classes
Phil Gibson, Paul G. Risser Innovative Teaching Fellow and Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Plant Physiology and Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

Case studies are valuable teaching tools because of their ability to pull students into the topic. Like other approaches, however, they can potentially be viewed as discrete items of information that students may have difficulty connecting to other topics and concepts when they are presented, conducted, and completed in one class session. However, when case studies are expanded to include multiple topics or woven together to connect individual but conceptually related cases, the multi-day case study experience can be used to explore topics in a larger context. In this session, I will present examples of how I use multi-day cases that involve both lecture and lab components to provide a comprehensive inquiry into a topic. Participants will identify topics, cases, or case study ideas that they can begin developing into larger case study activities.


2:15PM – 2:30PM

COFFEE BREAK


2:30PM – 4:00PM

BREAK-OUT SESSION 7

Track A: Case-Based Learning in the Biomedical Sciences
Bill Cliff, Professor, Department of Biology, Niagara University,Lewiston, NY

There is a rich and extensive history of using case-based teaching and learning at the interface between science and clinical medicine. This session will explore ways that case studies can continue to be employed for effective instruction in the biomedical sciences.  Following the dictums of Wiggins and McTighe, a “backward” design approach will be offered as the preferred means to promote successful case-based learning. Guided by a framework that identifies issues and concerns central to backward design, participants will be shown a favorable strategy for managing case-based learning in the biomedical science classroom. Participants will be challenged to use this approach to begin devising or reengineering a case of their own. A final discussion will provide opportunity for comparison of case-based learning methods, assessment tools, and student learning outcomes in the biomedical sciences. Participants should expect to leave the workshop better equipped to incorporate case-based teaching and learning into their own courses in the biomedical sciences.

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Track B: Top Ten Tips to Help You Successfully Create and Implement Team-Based Learning using Case Studies in Your Class
Sandra Westmoreland, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX

In this workshop, we will discuss how to use the Team-Based Learning (TBL) method of teaching with case studies as the “centerpiece” for critical thinking. First, we’ll introduce the TBL basic learning model, followed by helpful information (learned the hard way by the facilitator!) on the “nuts and bolts” of making this model work smoothly in your class. Get answers to questions such as these: How do I pick a case for my class that will really work? How do I organize and manage the groups, materials, and time for class (even if I have hundreds of students)? How can I make the cases “user friendly” for both students and teachers? How can I know if my case is really accomplishing the learning goals I intended? Leave the session empowered to create lessons for your own students using Team-Based Learning and case studies.

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Track C: Teaching Material for Human Case Studies to Teach Evolution
Briana Pobiner, Paleoanthropologist and Educator, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, and Melissa Csikari, Program Officer, Science Education, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

In this interactive workshop, participants will receive an overview of the freely available materials created as part of the “Teaching Evolution through Human Examples” (TEtHE) project, which developed four curriculum units (Adaptation to Altitude, Evolution of Human Skin Color, Malaria, and What Does It Mean To Be Human?), and a CRS (Cultural and Religious Sensitivity) teaching strategies resource that is designed to help teachers create a comfortable and supportive classroom environment for teaching evolution. You will practice one of the curriculum unit lessons and one part of the CRS classroom activities. The workshop will also include a brainstorming activity about obstacles and opportunities for teaching evolution that will provide you with possible ways to introduce the topic in your classroom in the event you are situated in an area where you know or fear you may face resistance to it.