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Sometimes Less is Better

The Treatment of Thromboembolism


Author(s)

Angela Wisniewski
Department of Family Medicine and Pharmacy Practice
University at Buffalo
amw25@buffalo.edu
Thuy N. Nguyen
Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy
University of Southern California
t.nguyen@usc.edu
David Newberger
Department of Family Medicine
University at Buffalo
dsn@buffalo.edu

Abstract

“Ed Cramer” is a 47-year-old mechanical engineer who is being treated for venous thromboembolism. He was 45 when he first developed a blood clot in the lower part of his left leg and had to be hospitalized for five days. A year later, he developed a second blood clot, which almost killed him. This case study explores the physiology and treatment of venous thromboembolism, a condition which kills 60,000 people each year in the United States. The case was developed for use in graduate-level courses in medicine and pharmacy.


Objectives

  • To review the physiology and pathophysiology of the coagulation cascade.
  • To be introduced to contemporary developments in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.
  • To gain an appreciation of the statistical methodology employed, as well as analyzing in-depth the tables and charts provided in the article.
  • To conduct a thorough critical appraisal of an article in the current medical literature.
  • To apply knowledge gained and conclusions from the current medical literature to treatment decisions in a specific patient case.

Keywords

Venous thromboembolism; anticoagulation; coagulation cascade; Virchow's Triad; warfarin therapy

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Graduate, Professional (degree program), Clinical education, Continuing education

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Interrupted, Journal Article, Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Pharmacy / Pharmacology  |   Physiology  |   Medicine (General)  |  


Date Posted

08/16/04

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