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Mini Cases in Movement Disorders


Author(s)

Antoinette Miller
Psychology Department
Clayton State University
antoinettemiller@clayton.edu

Abstract

This collection of six short cases focuses on brain areas and neurotransmitters involved in the control of movement. Students are divided into working groups and given one or more of the case descriptions. Each scenario depicts a breakdown in the motor system that can be traced (at least in part) to some brain area or areas. Useful for a variety of courses, including physiological psychology and neurobiology, these cases are intended to give students an opportunity to apply knowledge gained from readings and lectures to real-life situations inspired by patient cases described in the literature.


Objectives

  • Learn about the areas of the brain associated with voluntary movement and movement control.
  • Become familiar with one or more particular neurological disorders that affect movement, including treatment or intervention options .
  • Become familiar with the motor consequences of damage to or dysfunction in a brain area or areas.

Keywords

Movement; brain; neurobiology; neurotransmitter; disorder; Huntington’s chorea; Parkinson’s disease; Tourette syndrome; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Lou Gehrig’s disease

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate upper division, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Mini-Case, Problem-Based Learning

Language

English

Subject Headings

Physiology  |   Neuroscience  |   Psychology  |  


Date Posted

2/11/2008

Teaching Notes

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Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Answer Key

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