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Kate-tastrophy

A Case Study in Brain Death


Author(s)

Rosemary Martin
School of Medicine / Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
The Australian National University
rosemary.martin@anu.edu.au

Abstract

In this interrupted case, students examine the concept of unconsciousness and develop an understanding of how clinicians diagnose death. Developed for a freshman course in human biology, the case focuses on brain death, but raises related issues, including organ donation. With some modifications, the case could be used in a neurobiology or psychology course, or in a philosophy or ethics course.


Objectives

  • To examine the concept of unconsciousness.
  • To understand how clinicians diagnose death.
  • To explore how brain trauma in the form of hemorrhage associated with the meninges can lead to loss of consciousness.
  • To explore the legal and ethical framework in which organ donation takes place.

Keywords

Irreversible coma; brain trauma; unconsciousness; subdural hematoma; subdural hemorrhage; meninges; reticular activating system; organ donation

Topical Areas

Ethics, Legal issues

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division, Clinical education

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Interrupted

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Medicine (General)  |   Neuroscience  |   Psychology  |  


Date Posted

09/29/03

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