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Extrasensory Perception: Pseudoscience?

A Battle at the Edge of Science


Author(s)

Sarah G. Stonefoot
Department of Art & Art History
Beloit College
stonefos@beloit.edu
Clyde Freeman Herreid
Department of Biological Sciences
University at Buffalo
herreid@buffalo.edu

Abstract

The overall purpose of this case study is to teach students to be skeptical of scientific claims, particularly those that are sensational and fall outside the boundaries of normal scientific explanation. Students read the case and then evaluate information to determine whether they believe there is enough scientific evidence to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception. The case was developed for use in an introductory science or psychology course, but would also be appropriate for courses in human biology in which the nervous system is explored.


Objectives

  • To teach students to be skeptical of sensational “scientific claims."
  • To evaluate information and data to determine whether there is enough scientific evidence to confirm ESP’s existence.

Keywords

Extrasensory perception; telepathy; clairvoyance; precognition; psychokinesis; paranormal; Ganzfeld procedure; experimental design; K.E. Zener; J.B. Rhine

Topical Areas

Scientific argumentation, Scientific method, Pseudoscience

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Directed, Demonstration

Language

English

Subject Headings

Science (General)  |   Psychology  |  


Date Posted

03/17/04

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