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Certified Cultured Beef

Raising Beef Without the Cow?


Author(s)

Bryan Hains
Department of Community and Leadership Development
University of Kentucky
bryan.hains@uky.edu
Dawn Hains
Independent Educational Consultant

Mark Balschweid
Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communication
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
mbalschweid2@unl.edu

Abstract

In this case study, students are introduced to concepts and techniques in modern biotechnology, as well as the possible implications of this emerging science, by considering the possibility of in vitro cultured meat. Intended for use in a college-level meat science, food science, or human nutrition course, the case could also be used in courses in environmental science, agribusiness, agriculture law and policy, animal philosophy/well-being, and high school AP food science.


Objectives

  • Explore the pros and cons of in vitro cultured meat and its human consumption.
  • Learn about two different methods for culturing meat in a scientific laboratory.
  • Analyze these two methods in terms of which is the most beneficial to the food industry, which is most scientifically feasible, and which is most economically feasible.

Keywords

Tissue engineering; cultured meat; meat culturization; in vitro meat; scaffolding; self-organizing meat culturing technique; meat substitutes

Topical Areas

Ethics, Policy issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Discussion

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biotechnology  |   Agriculture  |   Food Science / Technology  |   Nutrition  |  


Date Posted

05/18/06

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