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March 7, 2017

The Day the Microprocessors Died


Author(s)

Sohum Sohoni
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Oklahoma State University
sohum.sohoni@okstate.edu
Matt Reiten
Technical Staff
GMA Industries
mtreiten@gmail.com

Abstract

The storyline of this case study describes a failure of a central system (much like the Internet of today) that occurs in the future, with some degree of mystery as to the cause. Originally designed for a junior level introductory course on microprocessors for computer engineering students, this icebreaker case study illustrates our increasing reliance on technology, particularly highlighting the importance and ubiquity of microprocessors. The discussion involves a number of new technologies and lays the groundwork for future discussions on good system design and integration of secure processors for embedded systems.


Objectives

  • Demosntrate how technology plays an important role in our lives by showing how many “microprocessors” we interact with and depend on each day.
  • Introduce and discuss new terms such as 8-bit processors, embedded systems, pervasive computing, and OLEDs.
  • Show how widely 8-bit or 16-bit microprocessors are still used.
  • Discuss system design, security, and good practices in engineering design.

Keywords

Microprocessor; ubiquitous computing; system design; system failure; embedded system; biometrics; organic light emitting diode; OLED

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Discussion

Language

English

Subject Headings

Electrical Engineering  |   Computer Engineering  |  


Date Posted

04/29/07

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