Skip to Content

Do You Really Know What You're Eating?

A Case Study on Genetically Modified Foods


Author(s)

Wayne Shew (rr)
Department of Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
Mary Celeste Reese
Department of Biological Sciences
Mississippi State University
mcr4@biology.msstate.edu

Abstract

Starting from a fictional “news” report about an apparent allergic reaction to a taco tainted by genetically modified corn, students consider some of the techniques and procedures used in modern molecular genetics and microbiology as well as some of the issues associated with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Originally designed for role-play and PowerPoint assignments, suggestions for a shortened version are also provided. Suitable for a general microbiology course, the case could also be used in an introductory molecular biology course with appropriate modifications. Various levels of coverage of the topic of recombinant DNA are possible.


Objectives

  • To present an overview of the techniques used in the production of GMOs.
  • To understand the role of microbes in biotechnology
  • To consider an important ethical issue—should we genetically manipulate organisms?
  • To understand the role that government agencies play in the regulation of development and the use of genetically modified organisms.

Keywords

Genetically modified organism; GMO; agricultural biotechnology; recombinant DNA; transgenic plant; gene transfer; Bt protein; Bacillus thuringiensis; ELISA; allergen; food allergy; anaphylactic shock; corn

Topical Areas

Ethics, Regulatory issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Role-Play, Student Presentations

Language

English

Subject Headings

Microbiology  |   Molecular Biology  |   Food Science / Technology  |   Biotechnology  |   Botany / Plant Science  |   Agriculture  |  


Date Posted

06/30/07

Teaching Notes

Case teaching notes are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Answer Key

Answer keys for the cases in our collection are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

Comments