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Pesticides

Can We Do Without Them?


Author(s)

Laurie A. Parendes
Department of Geosciences
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
lparendes@edinboro.edu
Scott H. Burris
Department of Agricultural Education and Communications
Texas Tech University
scott.burris@ttu.edu

Abstract

By simulating a public hearing, this case study requires that students sift through and organize information on pesticide use presented to them from the perspective of different stakeholders. The case asks a fundamental question, Can we do without pesticides?, and gives students an opportunity to explore the ecological, ethical, economic, social, and political issues surrounding that question. Developed for an environmental issues course, the case would be appropriate for any introductory course that addresses human-environment interactions.


Objectives

  • Define the terms "pest" and "pesticide" and give specific examples.
  • Discuss benefits and harmful effects of pesticide use.
  • Discuss implications of banning pesticides.
  • Articulate the dilemmas underlying this case, including the ecological, ethical, economic, social, and political issues involved.

Keywords

Pest; pesticide; avicide herbicide; fungicide; molluscicide; ovicide; rodenticide; herbicide; Silent Spring; Rachel Carson

Topical Areas

Ethics, Policy issues, Regulatory issues, Social issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Dilemma/Decision, Interrupted, Public Hearing

Language

English

Subject Headings

Environmental Science  |   Natural Resource Management  |   Agriculture  |   Public Health  |  


Date Posted

07/18/05

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