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Fetal Tissue Research and Parkinson's Disease


Author(s)

Charles R. Fourtner
Department of Biological Sciences
University at Buffalo
fourtner@buffalo.edu
Clyde Freeman Herreid
Department of Biological Sciences
University at Buffalo
herreid@buffalo.edu

Abstract

In this role-playing case study on Parkinson’s disease, students learn about brain injury and brain repair mechanisms, the physical and psychological effects of a degenerative disease on a patient and her family, the ethics of fetal tissue research, and the sociological implications of an aging population. The case has been used in a "Great Discoveries in Science" non-majors’ course for juniors and seniors as well as in a seminar in neuroscience for University Honors freshmen and sophomores.


Objectives

  • Learn fundamental principles of neurophysiology.
  • Learn about brain injury and brain repair mechanisms.
  • Consider the physical and psychological effects of a degenerative disease on a patient and her family.
  • Consider some cutting-edge research for the possible "cure" of the disorder.
  • Explore the ethical questions surrounding the use of fetal tissue in research programs.
  • Consider the sociological implications of an aging population.

Keywords

Parkinson's disease; neurodegenerative disease; neurophysiology; fetal tissue research; neural transplant; aging; bioethics

Topical Areas

Ethics, Social issues

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division, General public & informal education

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Discussion, Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Medicine (General)  |   Neuroscience  |   Public Health  |   Sociology  |  


Date Posted

11/14/99

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