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The Case of the Newborn Nightmare


Author(s)

Andrea C. Wade
Academic Services
Monroe Community College
awade13@monroecc.edu

Abstract

Three newborns left in the care of "Dr. Mark Maddison" have developed a mysterious rash. Under increasing pressure from hospital administrators and distressed parents, the doctor must diagnose and treat the infants. Students are given discrete pieces of information in this interrupted case study and asked to find additional information outside of class to solve the mystery. The case was developed for use in a clinically oriented microbiology course for nursing, allied health, and pre-medical students.


Objectives

  • Understand the step-wise approach to problem solving used in epidemiology.
  • Apply the concept of differential diagnosis to a simulated case.
  • Emphasize the role of contact in the spread of nosocomial infections and reinforce the value of handwashing in its prevention.
  • Learn and practice the following techniques: Gram stain, assessment of microscopic morphology, assessment of colonial morphology, catalase testing, and coagulase testing.

Keywords

Staphylococci; infection; infectious disease; bacteria; bacterial disease; differential diagnosis; hand-washing

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Interrupted

Language

English

Subject Headings

Microbiology  |   Medicine (General)  |   Nursing  |   Epidemiology  |   Public Health  |  


Date Posted

10/10/01

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