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Threats to Biodiversity

A Case Study of Hawaiian Birds


Author(s)

Sarah K. Huber
Department of Fisheries Science
The College of William & Mary
skhuber@wm.edu
Paula P. Lemons
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Georgia
plemons@uga.edu

Abstract

In this case study, students learn about introduced species and how they pose a threat to biodiversity by analyzing the impact of introduced species on the native bird populations of the Hawaiian Islands. Developed for an introductory biology course, the case could also be used in upper-level courses, such as ecology, conservation biology, evolution, biodiversity, and the biology of social issues, or in a non-majors biology course.


Objectives

  • Learn what makes a certain introduced species more likely than another to become established in a new area.
  • Learn how introduced species can directly and indirectly affect endemic species.
  • Learn why certain endemic species (e.g., Hawaiian birds) are particularly vulnerable to introduced species.
  • Gain experience in data analysis and how collaboration contributes to studying complex biological problems

Keywords

Biodiversity; introduced species; exotic species; endemic species; habitat fragmentation; Hawaii

Topical Areas

Scientific method

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Analysis (Issues), Jig-Saw, Student Presentations

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Ecology  |   Evolutionary Biology  |  


Date Posted

06/28/02

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