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Mini Cases in Language


Author(s)

Antoinette Miller
Psychology Department
Clayton State University
antoinettemiller@clayton.edu

Abstract

This series of mini cases focuses on language deficits (aphasias) and their likely organic causes (problems in specific brain areas). Students read one of the six cases, which are based on actual cases reported in the literature, and connect the symptoms described in the case to a specific aphasia and the affected brain area(s). The cases could be used in a variety of courses, including physiological psychology, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cognitive science, sensation and perception, and cognitive neuropsychology/neuroscience.


Objectives

  • Know and understand the cortical areas associated with language; this will include knowledge of specific brain areas, their functions, and some conditions that may arise when damage or dysfunction occurs.
  • Be familiar with the aspects of one or more language disorders.
  • Be able to work with other students to identify the relevant details in an ambiguous and ill-defined problem and research the important aspects.

Keywords

Aphasia; Wernicke-Geschwind model of language; dyslexia; verbal auditory agnosia; brain; Broca’s area; Wernicke’s area; angular gyrus; arcuate fasciculus; spoken communication, reading; language processing; neuropsychology; neurobiology

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate upper division, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Mini-Case, Problem-Based Learning

Language

English

Subject Headings

Neuroscience  |   Psychology  |   Physiology  |   Communication Science  |   Linguistics  |  


Date Posted

04/02/09

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