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Banana Split: To Eat or Not to Eat


Author(s)

Lori M. Carris
Department of Plant Pathology
Washington State University
carris@wsu.edu
Nancy L. Jacobson
Biology Department
Ithaca College
jacobson@ithaca.edu

Abstract

This case focuses on the banana, the most popular fruit in the world.  In the first part of the case, students are introduced to the history of "Banana Republics" and the biological constraints to banana production, including the devastating fungal pathogens that cause black Sigatoka and Panama disease.  In the second part, they learn about ethical consumerism, organic and conventional agriculture, and Fair Trade products. The case was developed for an interdisciplinary capstone course, "Global Issues in the Sciences." It could also be used in courses in environmental studies, general biology, agriculture, and plant pathology.


Objectives

  • Understand what is meant by "ethical consumerism."
  • Learn the differences between conventional, organic, Fair Trade, and agroforestry food production systems.
  • Learn about the history of banana production in Latin America.
  • Develop a familiarity with tropical agriculture, including constraints such as diseases and pests.
  • Better understand the connection between what we eat, how it is produced, and where it is produced.

Keywords

Banana; fungal plant pathogen; Panama disease; Fusarium wilt; black Sigatoka disease; pesticide; fungicide; ethical consumerism; Fair Trade; organic; agroforestry; ecoagriculture; Rainforest Alliance; developing world; tropics; Latin America

Topical Areas

Ethics, Legal issues, Policy issues, Social issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Dilemma/Decision, Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Environmental Science  |   Biology (General)  |   Agriculture  |   Botany / Plant Science  |   Food Science / Technology  |   Business / Management Science  |  


Date Posted

11/21/2010

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