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The Art of a Deal

A Kyoto Protocol Simulation


Author(s)

Richard Cowlishaw
Biology Department
Southwestern College
Richard.Cowlishaw@sckans.edu
Charles Hunter
Biology Department
Southwestern College
Charles.Hunter@sckans.edu
Jason Coy
History Department
College of Charleston
coyj@cofc.edu
Michael Tessmer
Chemistry Department
Southwestern College
mtessmer@sckans.edu

Abstract

This case is a classroom simulation of the types of negotiations that went into the Kyoto Protocol agreement on limiting global greenhouse gas emissions. It was developed for an environmental science course for first-year college students with minimal science backgrounds. Groups of students represent various developed and developing countries as they negotiate an agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. One of the main objectives is to show that a global problem requires a global solution, but this can be difficult when confounded by national interests. This objective makes the case potentially appropriate for other courses that deal with conflict resolution such as public policy courses, international relations, and certain business courses.


Objectives

  • Examine issues related to a potential worldwide solution to greenhouse gas emission increases.
  • Teach students some details of the Kyoto Protocol.
  • Show students the challenges associated with making an agreement involving numerous groups with different interests.

Keywords

Global warming; climate change; greenhouse gas; greenhouse effect; carbon dioxide emissions; CO2 emissions; Kyoto protocol; conflict resolution; negotiation; public policy

Topical Areas

Policy issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Natural Resource Management  |   Environmental Science  |   Biology (General)  |   Chemistry (General)  |   Science (General)  |   Business / Management Science  |  


Date Posted

11/28/06

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