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Reproductive Isolation in Columbines


Author(s)

J. Phil Gibson
Department of Biology and Department of Microbiology & Plant Biology
University of Oklahoma
jpgibson@ou.edu

Abstract

This clicker case uses plant-pollinator interactions in columbines as a biological scenario to teach students about evolution, reproductive isolation, and angiosperm reproduction. The case is based on an approach to evolution education called tree-thinking that emphasizes the construction, interpretation, and evaluation of phylogenetic trees as an approach to addressing biological and evolutionary questions. It also presents basic concepts of structure-function relationships in flowers and how this influences behavior and effectiveness of different pollinators. Designed for use in a large introductory level class, the case could also be used in smaller classes and in upper-level courses. It is appropriate for use in units on evolution, floral biology, or multispecies interactions.


Objectives

  • Describe how phylogenetic trees represent hypotheses about relationships among species that can be used to address evolutionary questions.
  • Understand how species represent different lineages that have diverged from a common ancestor.
  • Explain how floral features influence pollinator behavior and shape reproductive isolation in plants.

Keywords

Plants; flowers; columbines; Aquilegia pubescens; Aquilegia formosa; species concepts; tree-thinking; pollinators; pollination; mutualism

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF, PowerPoint

Type Methods

Clicker, Interrupted

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Evolutionary Biology  |   Botany / Plant Science  |   Ecology  |  


Date Posted

10/24/2012

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