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Exotics

Whether to Plant the Honeysuckle


Author(s)

Darlene Panvini
Biology Department
Belmont University
darlene.panvinid@belmont.edu

Abstract

This case examines the biological, ecological, social, political, and economic factors surrounding exotic species as well as the role of resource managers in shaping public policy on environmental issues. In addition to conservation ecology courses, this case would be appropriate for a non-majors science course, a bioethics course, or a majors biology course such as ecology.


Objectives

  • Describe the factors (ecological, biological, social, political, and economic) that promote the spread of exotic species.
  • Identify the impacts of exotics on native ecological systems.
  • Debate the pros and cons of using exotic species.
  • Evaluate the role that biologists should play in shaping public policy regarding exotics.
  • Apply general characteristics of exotics and the impact of exotics on ecological systems to other species besides the species mentioned in the case.

Keywords

exotic species; conservation; biodiversity; honeysuckle; Lonicera maackii; ecosystem stability; invasive species; invasive; native; indigenous;

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Directed, Discussion, Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Ecology  |   Environmental Science  |   Natural Resource Management  |   Science (General)  |  


Date Posted

10/23/2001

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