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What's Wrong with Me?

Easy and Hard Diagnoses in Immunology


Author(s)

Tiara G. Pérez Morales
Biological Sciences
Benedictine University
tperezmorales@ben.edu
Cynthia L. Darnell
Department of Biology
Duke University
cynthia.darnell@duke.edu
Jayashree Sarathy
Biological Sciences
Benedictine University
jsarathy@ben.edu
Heinery Arevalo
College of Dentistry
University of Illinois at Chicago

Abstract

This set of “mini cases” focuses on autoimmune diseases, which arise when the immune system is unable to recognize its own components. Students are presented with two patients, “Claudia” and “Anita,” who are introduced through the use of two short videos. Acting in the role of immunologists, students are then assigned to teams and given one of the patient cases to explore in detail, integrating fundamental immunology concepts with laboratory tests to develop a diagnosis and course of treatment for their patient. The two patient scenarios can be easily updated as new guidelines and treatments are described. These mini cases are appropriate for junior or senior undergraduates or first year graduate students in the healthcare profession.


Objectives

  • Recall different autoimmune diseases and reactions associated with them.
  • Correlate immunological topics with current laboratory tests performed for autoimmune differentials.
  • Connect immunological topics to the mechanisms of action of traditional and immunotherapy treatments.
  • Reflect on how best to discuss an immunological disease diagnosis and treatment.
  • Develop team-based skills required in the medical field.

Keywords

Immunotherapy; rheumatoid arthritis; systemic lupus erythematosus; SLE; autoimmune disease; mixed-connective tissue disease; MCTD; psoriatic arthritis

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate upper division, Graduate

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Discussion, Interrupted, Mini-Case

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Medicine (General)  |   Nursing  |  


Date Posted

08/05/2020

Teaching Notes

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Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Supplemental Materials

The videos below introduce the two patients featured in this case study.

  Meet Claudia
  Meet Anita

Answer Key

Answer keys for the cases in our collection are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

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