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Abracadabra

Magic Johnson and Anti-HIV Treatments


Author(s)

Brian Rybarczyk
Graduate School
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
brybar@unc.edu

Abstract

This case introduces students to HIV, its life cycle, treatment, and problems associated with treatment options. The case, which incorporates critical thinking skills, active learning, self-directed study, and peer-to-peer learning, was developed for use in an undergraduate upper-level biology course entitled “The Molecular Basis of Disease.” It could also be used in an immunology class, a molecular evolution class, or a general biology class to introduce viruses.


Objectives

  • Describe the symptoms related to HIV/AIDS and how a person is tested for HIV.
  • Propose treatment targets for controlling HIV infection based on its life cycle.
  • Speculate over biological and immunological reasons for why HIV infected people are non-progressors and progressors.
  • Describe molecular mechanisms of HIV drug resistance and molecular evolution.
  • Determine the pros and cons for specific HIV treatment approaches

Keywords

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; AIDS; human immunodeficiency virus; HIV; infectious disease; progressor; highly active antiretroviral therapy; HAART; Combivir; GlaxoSmithKline; Magic Johnson

Topical Areas

Scientific argumentation, Social issues

Educational Level

High school, Undergraduate lower division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Interrupted, Role-Play

Language

English

Subject Headings

Biology (General)  |   Molecular Biology  |   Public Health  |  


Date Posted

04/03/03

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