Skip to Content

A Case of Pharyngitis


Author(s)

David F. Dean (rr)
Department of Biology
Spring Hill College
ddean@shc.edu

Abstract

Seven-year-old “Jason Hornbuckle” has been complaining for the past 12 hours of pain when he swallows.  He also has a headache and has vomited twice.  His mother decides to take him to the pediatrician.  Students read a brief clinical history of the patient and a description of the relevant signs and symptoms, then answer a set of directed questions designed to probe the underlying anatomy, physiology, and pathology underlying Jason's condition. The case has been used in a sophomore-level course in human anatomy and physiology for pre-med and nursing students.


Objectives

  • The mechanism by which the changes seen at a site of inflammation relate to alterations in small blood vessels.
  • The role played by neutrophils in the resolution of a bacterial infection.
  • The structure and function of lymph nodes and tonsils.
  • The beneficial effects of fever.
  • The mechanism by which the number of white blood cells in the circulation can be increased during an infection.

Keywords

Hemolymphatic system; lymphadenopathy; pharyngitis; inflammation; neutrophils; neutrophilic leukocytosis; phagocytosis; pyrogens; leucopoiesis

Topical Areas

N/A

Educational Level

Undergraduate lower division, Undergraduate upper division

Format

PDF

Type / Methods

Directed

Language

English

Subject Headings

Physiology  |   Medicine (General)  |   Nursing  |  


Date Posted

09/08/06

Teaching Notes

Case teaching notes are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

Teaching notes are intended to help teachers select and adopt a case. They typically include a summary of the case, teaching objectives, information about the intended audience, details about how the case may be taught, and a list of references and resources.

Answer Key

Answer keys for the cases in our collection are password-protected and access to them is limited to paid subscribed instructors. To become a paid subscriber, begin the process by registering.

Comments